Air Force will keep flying over South China Sea despite China’s surface-to-air missile buildup

 (July 21, 2015) Ships and submarines from the Republic of Singapore Navy and U.S. Navy gather in formation during the underway phase of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Singapore 2015. CARAT is an annual, bilateral exercise series with the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the armed forces of nine partner nations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joe Bishop/Released)
(July 21, 2015) Ships and submarines from the Republic of Singapore Navy and U.S. Navy gather in formation during the underway phase of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Singapore 2015. CARAT is an annual, bilateral exercise series with the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and the armed forces of nine partner nations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joe Bishop/Released)


CANBERRA, Australia — The U.S. will continue to fly daily missions over the South China Sea despite a buildup of Chinese surface-to-air missiles and fighter jets in the contested region, with both nations’ in discussions to avoid any “miscalculation,” a top U.S. general said Tuesday.

Gen. Lori Robinson, the commander of the Pacific , also urged other nations to exercise their freedom to fly and sail in international airspace and waters claimed byChina in the South China Sea “or risk losing it throughout the region.”

“We’ve watched the increased capability on those islands, whether it’s the fighters, whether it’s the missiles or the 10,000-foot runways. We will continue to do as we’ve always done, and that is fly and sail in international airspace in accordance to international rules and norms,” Robinson told reporters in Australia’s capital, Canberra, where she will address the Royal Australian biennial Air Power Conference next week.

Robinson declined to say how the United States would retaliate if a U.S. plane was shot down by the Chinese.

Several governments have conflicting claims in the South China Sea, a major conduit for world trade. The U.S. lays no claims to the waters, but says it has an interest in ensuring freedom of navigation and overflight and non-use of force and coercion to assert claims.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi took a hard line Tuesday on the country’s claims to virtually all of the South China Sea, saying Beijing won’t permit other nations to infringe on what it considers its sovereign rights in the strategically vital area.

Speaking to reporters at an annual news conference in Beijing, Wang said that another nation’s claim to freedom of navigation in the region doesn’t give it the right to do whatever it wants — an apparent reference to the U.S., which has sent naval ships past reefs where China has engaged in island-building.

Robinson conceded there was “a possibility of a miscalculation” leading to conflict in the increasingly militarized region.

But she said the United States and China had signed an agreement on air-to-air rules of behavior in international airspace in September and would continue discussions on the subject this year.

“That has allowed us to have continuous dialogue with the Chinese about how to conduct safe intercepts and intercepts in accordance with international rules and norms,” Robinson said.

She said Russian long-range aircraft were also increasingly active in the Pacific, flying around Japan and Guam.

As part of U.S. plans to increase its presence in the Pacific, Robinson said discussions were underway with the Australian to rotate U.S. bombers through the northern Australian bases at Darwin and Tindal.

“It gives us the opportunity to train our pilots to understand the theater and to strengthen our ties with our great allies, the Royal Australian ,” Robinson said.

U.S. already rotate through Darwin in a sign of an increasingly close bilateral alliance that riles China, Australia’s most important trade partner.


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